• April

    USACE collaborates with City of Gooding to reduce flood risk, improve safety

    Approximately 40 years ago, when Diane Houser first moved to the City of Gooding, Idaho, she noted deteriorating channel walls along the Little Wood River, a tributary of the Big Wood River in Idaho’s Magic Valley, which cuts through the small city.
  • March

    Serving the Northwest from afar

    Every day, Gabrielle Marucci sits down at her desk and logs into her computer, checking her email and meeting schedule. Her desk sits next to a window and, outside, one might expect to see scenery indicative of the Pacific Northwest. Marucci, after all, works for the Walla Walla District, located in the state of Washington.
  • What a leader looks like

    “What does being a leader mean to you?” This was a question posed by Lt. Col. ShaiLin KingSlack, Commander of the Walla Walla District, when she spoke to tribal students at schools in Pendleton, Oregon.
  • August

    The end of a long journey: a history of Lower Granite Lock and Dam

    It was early in the morning and a steam-powered paddleboat made its way up the lower Snake River, trimmed with colored flags. The date was June 19, 1975, and the mood was festive. The vessel was heading for Lower Granite Lock and Dam, whose pool had been raised just four months prior.
  • Piezometers: An essential component to dam safety

    Congress has invested $665,000 from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to install new prefabricated staircases for the safety of maintenance workers who use the staircases to inspect the condition of Luck Peak Dam.
  • July

    USACE Plans Fish Survival Testing this Fall on the Second Improved Fish Passage Turbine

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District has started the installation process in Unit 1 for another adjustable blade turbine designed for improved fish passage. The Corps has been working diligently to decrease fish injury and improve survival rates through turbines designed for improved fish passage at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam.
  • Larger than life: A history of Dworshak Dam

    In May 1948, floodwaters on the Columbia River overtopped the cofferdam where construction was underway on McNary Lock and Dam. This flood, one of the largest on record, was one of many documented in the region since the mid-1880s. The propensity for flooding in the Northwest sparked much discussion about regional flood control.
  • June

    Waiting in the wings: A history of Little Goose Lock and Dam

    By 1962, Ice Harbor Lock and Dam had been built and construction of the second lower Snake River dam, Lower Monumental, was being passed to the US Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District. The third dam in the queue was right on the heels of Lower Monumental, but construction could not begin until the details of its downstream neighbor were determined.
  • May

    'We’ll cross that bridge…': A history of Lower Monumental Lock and Dam

    Lower Monumental Lock and Dam sits on a remote stretch of the Snake River, in a landscape of wheat fields and rolling hills. The only town within a 20-minute drive is Kahlotus, Washington, six miles north, with a population of less than 200. The only major road is State Highway 261, which crosses the river at Lyons Ferry, 18 miles upriver.
  • April

    First Bipartisan Infrastructure Law project is a story of success for the Walla Walla District

    The Walla Walla District recently completed dredging work at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers near Lewiston, Idaho and downstream of Ice Harbor Dam. This is the first project the district has completed using Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funds.
  • From water to watts: A history of Ice Harbor Lock and Dam

    Ice Harbor Lock and Dam boasts some of the most cutting-edge hydropower technology in the world. Two advanced technology turbines currently sit in the powerhouse, with a third one on the way. These new turbines were designed to improve fish passage and generate electricity more efficiently.
  • March

    A step towards navigable waters: A history of McNary Lock and Dam

    As people moved into the Pacific Northwest, communities grew around the rivers, especially the Columbia and Snake. Back then, the rivers were temperamental and hard to navigate. However, there was a vision to create a river highway, one that would allow barges to carry cargo from the Pacific Ocean to the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater rivers, 465 miles inland.
  • February

    Guarding the Treasure Valley: A history of Lucky Peak Dam

    Every year, snowmelt from the surrounding mountains flows into creeks and streams that join the Boise River. When flows reach 7,000 cubic feet per second or higher, the river is considered at flood stage.
  • January

    Through fair or foul weather: A history of the Mill Creek Project

    In 1931, a torrent of brown water roared down Mill Creek, with water levels rising at a rate of one foot per hour. The water escaped the confines of the riverbanks and rushed through the City of Walla Walla, destroying homes, roads and bridges. Born in the wake of this disastrous event, the Mill Creek Project now stands to protect the city from floods like this.
  • November

    Keeping the lights on: Walla Walla Temporary Power Team installs generators in the wake of Hurricane Fiona

    On September 19, the day after Hurricane Fiona made landfall near Punta Tocón, members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District Planning and Response Team (PRT) boarded a plane in Atlanta and flew to Puerto Rico. The team landed in San Juan at 8 p.m., on a mission to install generators and provide temporary emergency power to the island.
  • September

    Exploring the USACE Walla Walla District: An Engineering Student’s Journey

    “I’ve always thought that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was all about hydropower. I didn’t think there was too much to it.”
  • New fish ladder planned for the Mill Creek Diversion Dam

    The Mill Creek Channel is getting an update.
  • August

    Uncovering the past: Mastodon jaw found on Corps land

    It was windy, and the little boat bounced on whitecaps as it crossed the Columbia River. On May 9, Walla Walla District archeologists and natural resource management staff were heading out to meet with tribal and community members to discuss an important discovery on Corps land.
  • May

    The Corps Environment - May 2022 issue now available

    The May 2022 issue of The Corps Environment is now available! This edition features initiatives from across the Army environmental community that are protecting and preserving our environment for current and future generations.
  • April

    Docks along the shoreline: The intersection of public and private property

    For those who live along the river, the idea of having a boat dock can be attractive. However, specific laws, rules and procedures go into installing a boat dock, and it’s important to be aware of the process, especially for those living adjacent to federally managed shorelines.