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Author: Hannah Mitchell
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  • September

    New fish ladder planned for the Mill Creek Diversion Dam

    The Mill Creek Channel is getting an update.
  • August

    Uncovering the past: Mastodon jaw found on Corps land

    It was windy, and the little boat bounced on whitecaps as it crossed the Columbia River. On May 9, Walla Walla District archeologists and natural resource management staff were heading out to meet with tribal and community members to discuss an important discovery on Corps land.
  • April

    Docks along the shoreline: The intersection of public and private property

    For those who live along the river, the idea of having a boat dock can be attractive. However, specific laws, rules and procedures go into installing a boat dock, and it’s important to be aware of the process, especially for those living adjacent to federally managed shorelines.
  • 4 million mouths to feed

    Just below Dworshak Dam, on the shore of the Clearwater River, lies the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery (DNFH). The DNFH raises millions of salmon and steelhead smolts every year to be released into the river and make their way down to the ocean.
  • Modernizing hydropower on the Snake River

    Hydropower, a clean, renewable and reliable energy source, just became safer for fish and more efficient at generating electricity, thanks to the new turbines at Ice Harbor Lock and Dam on the Snake River in southeast Washington.
  • February

    There and Back Again: A Salmon’s Tale in the Pacific Northwest

    Some fish live in freshwater streams and lakes. Other fish live in the ocean, in saltwater. Then there are salmon who do both. Salmon are anadromous, meaning they live part of their lives in freshwater and part in saltwater.
  • January

    Walla Walla County and Corps partner to increase Mill Creek Channel’s safety

    In October 2018, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, in partnership with the non-federal sponsor, Walla Walla County, began a General Investigation (GI) study on the Mill Creek Flood Control Project.
  • June

    Essential to the Mission

    Volunteers are an invaluable part of the Corps of Engineers team. The Walla Walla District Corps of Engineers is responsible for thousands of acres of land in Washington, Idaho and Oregon. Proper management of those lands would not be possible without the volunteers who lend their time and abilities to the mission.
  • May

    From Park Aide to Park Ranger

    For Jake Cordtz, it was never a question. The best place to work was the outside, and it was only a matter of time before he became a park ranger for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • March

    Brig. Gen. D. Peter Helmlinger speaks to Northwestern Division priorities during trip to Lucky Peak

    Brig. Gen. D. Peter Helmlinger, commander of the Corps’ Northwestern Division, came to Boise recently, to meet with Congressional staff, public officials and stakeholders.
  • Finding a place at the Corps

    Finding the perfect career isn’t easy, but for Jeannette Wilson, becoming the operations project manager (OPM) at Lower Monumental Lock and Dam was like finding gold at the end of the rainbow.
  • February

    Defining Hydropower: a glimpse into the world of a power plant operator

    Power plant operators are an integral to running a dam. But what does it mean to be an operator? To gain a better understanding of the job, we interviewed three power plant operators who work at dams in the Walla Walla District: Telzey Bartley, Billie Guille and Summer Dellamater.
  • Divers perform inspection of Ice Harbor’s Removable Spillway Weir

    For the Corps of Engineers, the onset of colder weather signals the beginning of dive season. While perhaps not an official season, most dive work is scheduled between November and March, when salmon runs are at their lowest. On November 17, a team of divers suited up at Ice Harbor Dam to perform the required 3-year inspection of the Removable Spillway Weir.
  • ‘He is focus and he’s freedom;’

    “I am 10th generation to serve,” Emily Klinefelter, Park Ranger with Lower Granite Natural Resource Office, said. “My grandmother filled my head with dreams about being a sailor. She served in WWII teaching young Americans and Russians how to use the anti-aircraft guns.”
  • Walla Walla District cost engineers provide expertise and support to FEMA and other federal agencies

    Natural disasters like floods and hurricanes can severely damage homes, businesses and infrastructure. Those who suffer damages in natural disasters can apply to FEMA for financial assistance. When this happens, a cost estimate is needed to determine how much money it would take to either repair or replace the structure in question.
  • January

    Corps partners with Flood Control District 10 to create predictive model to manage the Boise River

    The Corps is using the latest technology to develop tools that communities in Idaho can use to predict flooding. The technology: Two-dimensional modelling.
  • November

    Improving Biodiversity in the Habitat Management Units

    Habitat Management Units, or HMUs, are different from other parks. While parks are maintained to provide recreational opportunities, HMUs are areas of land dedicated to environmental stewardship.
  • October

    Corps repurposes native willow for habitat improvement

    In an effort to stabilize shorelines, protect cultural sites and improve habitat for fish and wildlife, Corps engineers, biologists and environmental scientists have repurposed native coyote willow found below the Mill Creek Diversion Dam at Rooks Park in Walla Walla.
  • August

    Constructing Habitat for an Industrious Owl

    For most bird species, the concept of living underground would be considered strange. For the burrowing owl, living anywhere else would be unthinkable.
  • June

    Corps employees develop debris removal device for safer fish passage at Little Goose Dam

    WALLA WALLA, WA – Two Corps employees at Little Goose Lock and Dam created a device that removed debris blockages within the dam.